Where am I? Settling in and Settling Down in the New World

Students study the early settlement period of St. Mary’s City. They are asked to analyze multiple perspectives using primary and secondary sources as they are introduced to this new culture. The students will use their knowledge and show their understanding of early settlements by creating a plan for a new settlement in Marie’s Land.

Lesson Objective

The students will work in groups to synthesize their knowledge of English settlements using primary and secondary sources to create a plan for a new settlement in the colony of Maryland meeting all criteria for success.

Enduring Understanding: Determine the reasons for colonial settlement (i.e., religious, economic, and individual freedom). Recognize the reasons settlements are founded on major river systems. (i.e., transportation, manmade boundaries, and food and water sources).

Materials

Procedure

  1. This lesson presumes that students have a working knowledge of primary and secondary sources, as well as map skills.
  2. Day 1: Tell Students they will be examining the immigration experience of early English settlers and gathering information using primary and secondary sources to determine how the settlement in Saint Mary’s City came to be.
  3. Distribute Where Maryland Began…the Colonial History of Saint Mary’s City to each pair of students. Share in small groups if needed.
  4. Have students read pages 11-20 and answer the following questions in their journal: Why did settlers leave their homeland? Why did they settle here?
  5. Jigsaw groups can also be used here to further break down reading assignments.
  6. Allow student pairs to visit the thinkport website to read/review/interact with the same information in a unique format. Sections include: Voyage to Marie’s Land and New Colony Begins.
  7. Ask students to discuss whether or not the information they have gathered is accurate. How do they know? Would you like to add to journal answers?
  8. Provide map / ‘An Exciting Voyage’ to students. Let students use information on pages 18-19 to complete.
  9. Exit Ticket: Why did the settlers come to Maryland?
  10. Day Two: Using the map of Maryland from the Maryland State Archives, ask students to identify what Maryland looked like to the settlers.
  11. Questions can be answered in journal, jigsaw groups, or whole class discussion, including: Why / How is this map different from the ones we use today? What do you see?
  12. Distribute Where Maryland Began…the Colonial History of Saint Mary’s City to each pair of students. Share in small groups if needed.
  13. Have students read pages 36-42 and answer the following questions in their journal: What was the environment like? How did the settlers modify their environment to meet their needs and wants? (Jigsaw groups can also be used here to further break down reading assignments).
  14. Allow student pairs to visit the thinkport website to read/review/interact with the same information in a unique format. Sections include: New Colony Begins; Read Colonist’s Diary (Father Andrew White)
  15. Exit Ticket or Closing discussion: What was the purpose of Father White’s Diary?
  16. Day Three: Activate knowledge by asking students what resources the settlers found when they arrived in Marie’s Land.
  17. Read Lord Baltimore’s Instructions as a class and allow time for students to complete and share.
  18. Distribute “Where Am I?” student packets
  19. Discuss how to complete the project and the criteria for success.
  20. Group students according to best practices and allow work time.
  21. Closing Discussion or Exit Ticket: What did you have to consider as you began to design your new settlement?
  22. Day Four: Remind students of their purpose in this project, review criteria for success, and allow work time. This should include time for students to answer journal questions found in the student packet.
  23. Stop work in time for students to share their new settlements.

Assessment

Students will be graded on their completed plan for a settlement in the New World.

All criteria for success must be met according to rubric.

Questions must be answered in a way that shows understanding of how settlements were planned/designed.

References

Maryland. “Maryland State Archives.” Map of Maryland, 1671. 2005. Maryland State Archives. March 3, 2013. http://msa.maryland.gov/msa/homepage/html/ogilbylg.html

Maryland Public Television. “Exploring Maryland’s Roots.” Thinkport. March 3, 2013.
http://mdroots.thinkport.org/default_flash.asp

Shoemaker, Sandy. Where Maryland Began…the Colonial History of St. Mary’s City. Leonardtown: Heritage Printing and Graphics, 2000.